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  1.   stlyesterday:

James B. Eads, salvage king of the Mississippi River, promised President Abraham Lincoln he could build iron-armored gunboats in 65 days. On Aug. 7, 1861, Eads won a contract to build seven burly gunboats from a novel design. At $89,000 apiece, each was to carry 13 heavy cannons, have 2.5-inches of armor and be delivered to Cairo, Ill., in 60 days. The gunboats were built in the Eads Boatyard in Carondelet. The gunboat’s five boilers, seen here, sat side-by-side and powered the engines that turned a single enclosed paddlewheel. (U.S. Naval Historical Center)
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    stlyesterday:

    James B. Eads, salvage king of the Mississippi River, promised President Abraham Lincoln he could build iron-armored gunboats in 65 days. On Aug. 7, 1861, Eads won a contract to build seven burly gunboats from a novel design. At $89,000 apiece, each was to carry 13 heavy cannons, have 2.5-inches of armor and be delivered to Cairo, Ill., in 60 days. The gunboats were built in the Eads Boatyard in Carondelet. The gunboat’s five boilers, seen here, sat side-by-side and powered the engines that turned a single enclosed paddlewheel. (U.S. Naval Historical Center)

    See more photos »

    • 5
    • Posted at 3:24 pm on 9.02.2011
  2.   For more than four decades, Tony Faust’s Oyster House and Restaurant, seen here in 1915, was the city’s premier place to eat and be seen. The dedicated clientele included the wealthy and powerful, touring notables, actors, baseball players, boxers and dandies of all sorts. Last call was on June 30, 1916, and the building at Broadway and Elm was demolished in 1933. (St. Louis Post-Dispatch)
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    For more than four decades, Tony Faust’s Oyster House and Restaurant, seen here in 1915, was the city’s premier place to eat and be seen. The dedicated clientele included the wealthy and powerful, touring notables, actors, baseball players, boxers and dandies of all sorts. Last call was on June 30, 1916, and the building at Broadway and Elm was demolished in 1933. (St. Louis Post-Dispatch)

    More photos from Faust’s »

    • 7
    • Posted at 11:00 am on 7.02.2011
  3.   stlyesterday:

The Exposition and Music Hall, at 13th and Olive streets, was the site of the Democratic national convention June 5-7, 1888. It was the second Democratic national convention held in St. Louis. The block-square building had been completed four years earlier. The party renominated President Grover Cleveland without bothering with a formal vote. Cleveland won the popular vote but lost in the Electoral College to Republican Benjamin Harrison. Democrats nominated Cleveland again in 1892, and he won the rematch against President Harrison, making Cleveland the only American president two serve two non-consecutive terms. (Missouri History Museum)
More political conventions held in St. Louis »

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    stlyesterday:

    The Exposition and Music Hall, at 13th and Olive streets, was the site of the Democratic national convention June 5-7, 1888. It was the second Democratic national convention held in St. Louis. The block-square building had been completed four years earlier. The party renominated President Grover Cleveland without bothering with a formal vote. Cleveland won the popular vote but lost in the Electoral College to Republican Benjamin Harrison. Democrats nominated Cleveland again in 1892, and he won the rematch against President Harrison, making Cleveland the only American president two serve two non-consecutive terms. (Missouri History Museum)

    More political conventions held in St. Louis »

    • 10
    • Posted at 6:24 pm on 6.10.2011
  4.   stlyesterday:

An F4 tornado tore through St. Louis and East St. Louis on May 27, 1896 — 115 years ago today. This scene at the southwest corner of Seventh and Rutger streets (left foreground) was the deadliest spot along the tornado’s 10-mile path, which was roughly along today’s Interstate 44 and across the Mississippi River. Seventeen people were killed when a three-story tenement building collapsed. Frederick Mauchenheimer, who ran a tavern on the ground floor, was playing cards with two patrons when the storm hit; they were among the dead.  Across the street, another six died. In all, 225 people were killed in the Great Cyclone; it is still Missouri’s deadliest tornado. (Missouri History Museum)
See more photos from the Great Cyclone »

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    stlyesterday:

    An F4 tornado tore through St. Louis and East St. Louis on May 27, 1896 — 115 years ago today. This scene at the southwest corner of Seventh and Rutger streets (left foreground) was the deadliest spot along the tornado’s 10-mile path, which was roughly along today’s Interstate 44 and across the Mississippi River. Seventeen people were killed when a three-story tenement building collapsed. Frederick Mauchenheimer, who ran a tavern on the ground floor, was playing cards with two patrons when the storm hit; they were among the dead.  Across the street, another six died. In all, 225 people were killed in the Great Cyclone; it is still Missouri’s deadliest tornado. (Missouri History Museum)

    See more photos from the Great Cyclone »

    • 6
    • Posted at 10:40 am on 5.29.2011